Students on Speed

‘M’ (no, not that one) did a fantastic CPD slot this week on development of writing and tools to help students craft analytical paragraphs.

Here’s a summary of the tool. It’s called SPEED.

  • Signpost: be specific about the thing you are talking about (what I used to call ‘scoping the problem’)
  • Point: make the point that you want to make
  • Evidence: present the evidence that supports the point you just made
  • Explanation: explain how the evidence supports your point
  • Discussion: discuss the point you made, for example including contrary views or evaluating benefits.

Many of the examples were from English or subjects (e.g. History) that place a large emphasis on the ability to present written arguments. But this works for computing and ICT too. Here’s a basic example:

Signpost

Looking at the feedback form webpage on version 2 of my website

Point

most users found it easy to use and quick to enter the information requested.

Evidence

For example, 8 out of the 11 responses to my survey were positive or very positive when asked about the usability of that page.

Explanation

This high score suggests that most users would be able to use the feedback form successfully.

Discussion

However, because all of my survey responses were from students, it may be that other types users, for example older users, would have difficulty using the site.

As a paragraph you get:

Looking at the feedback form webpage on version 2 of my website most users found it easy to use and quick to enter the information requested. For example, 8 out of the 11 responses to my survey were positive or very positive when asked about the usability of that page. This high score suggests that most users would be able to use the feedback form successfully. However, because all of my survey responses were from students, it may be that other types users, for example older users, would have difficulty using the site.

Neat.

#ukedchat Class room displays

Last night the topic for the #ukedchat discussion was “Classroom displays? Who are they for?”. Some techie-based snippets of inspiration:

  • screen saver displays
  • desktop background on student machines
  • cheap photo frames
  • QR codes for more information (check school policy on mobile phone use)
  • wireless webcam to display work on white board as it happens (and related: taking pictures of work with a portable device (iPad or similar) and displaying to class on projector using Evernote)

 

The summary of the discussion is available on the ukedchat site.

OECD on supporting new teachers

The OECD EducationToday has a post on supporting new teachers. They looked at the relatively high attrition rate for new teachers (around 10% leave the profession within the first three years of teaching) and found the new teachers confidence in their own abilities was likely to be a major contributing factor.

The full Teaching in Focus brief is available from OECD as is the survey data on which the findings were based.